Great British Bake Off star gives the scoop on show at Portsmouth school kitchen

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HIS baking skills and laid-back charm have made Southsea’s Enwezor Nzegwu a household name.

And now the former hopeful from this season’s Great British Bake Off has spoken about his time on the hit show, his love of baking and the controversy that saw him axed.

Pupils from Wimborne Infant School (l-r) Nyaz Hanif, Zena Green, Katie Mann and Joel Del Piccolo with deputy headteacher Lindsay Rebbitt, headteacher Julie Cragg and Great British Bake Off contestant Enwezor Nzegwu.' 'Picture: Allan Hutchings (142735-677)

Pupils from Wimborne Infant School (l-r) Nyaz Hanif, Zena Green, Katie Mann and Joel Del Piccolo with deputy headteacher Lindsay Rebbitt, headteacher Julie Cragg and Great British Bake Off contestant Enwezor Nzegwu.' 'Picture: Allan Hutchings (142735-677)

The 39-year-old said: ‘It was a fantastic experience.

‘I just wish it had lasted a bit longer.’

Enwezor was at Wimborne Infants School in Southsea to give an introductory lesson in the school’s new pupil kitchen.

He said the kitchen, which will be used by four to seven-year-olds along with parent volunteers, was a great idea.

He said: ‘This will let the kids get into baking and cooking and know where everything comes from, and learn some really useful skills that they’ll use their whole lives.’

Enwezor was eliminated in round two of the Bake Off after using shop-bought fondant to make 3D cookies.

But he said he was not the only baker who used the ready-made ingredient in the baking challenge.

Enwezor said: ‘Nancy used it, Jordan used it, Norman used it, we all used it.’

He said he was having a bad week in the kitchen anyway, and being subject to judge Mary Berry’s infamous ‘death stare’ didn’t help.

He said: ‘It was a close run thing when I left the show.

‘I think it was the fact that Mary gave me “the Mary stare” and the fact that I was near the bottom anyway, they thought they would link that together.’

Enwezor said the show’s other big controversy – in which contestant Diana Beard allegedly ruined a competitor’s chances by taking his ice cream out of the fridge – was also due to ‘creative’ editing.

‘The editing of that episode did not do Diana any favours,’ he said.

‘It was completely overblown, it was not her fault at all.’

A business consultant at the University of Portsmouth, Enwezor said he had no plans to move his career to the kitchen, but hinted at producing a cookbook on the back of the show’s success.

Enwezor helped a group of Year 1 pupils make Viennese whirl biscuits in their new kitchen.

Five-year-old Katie Mann said: ‘It’s good.

‘I like doing the mixing.’