Images reveal new-look Mary Rose Museum

Picture: Isle of Wight Radio/PA Wire

REGIONAL: Asda apologises after mis-spelling Isle of Wight on carrier bags for new island store

0
Have your say

EXCLUSIVE pictures have been released revealing what the inside of the new Mary Rose museum will look like when it opens next year.

The computer-generated images reveal sleek glass displays, interactive screens and areas showing what it was like for the 500 men on board the Tudor warship.

TUDOR LIFE A mock-up of below decks

TUDOR LIFE A mock-up of below decks

Christopher Dobbs, head of interpretation at the Mary Rose Museum, said: ‘It’s fantastic to be able to show people what it will look like.

‘This is a very exciting process for us. Looking at designers’ plans, it’s hard to visualise what it will look like but these 3D images really bring it alive.’

The new £35m museum at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard will open in autumn 2012 – 30 years after the ship was raised from the seabed.

It has been designed by architects Wilkinson Eyre – best known for the Millennium Bridge over the River Tyne in Newcastle.

A display showing the Cowdray engraving

A display showing the Cowdray engraving

For the Mary Rose museum, the firm designed a ‘jewel box’, placing the hull at the centre with galleries running the length of the ship, each at a level corresponding to the deck levels.

Thousands of Tudor artefacts that sank with the Mary Rose in 1545 will be on display in galleries designed by the architect and maritime archaeologist Chris Brandon.

Dorset-based designers The ID Group took his designs to produce the computerised pictures released today.

It comes after Prince Harry visited to lay the foundation stone of the new museum last week – marking a major milestone in the complex heritage and building project.

Construction firm Warings is having to build the museum around the hull of the ship, which is temporarily housed in a fibreglass box warmed to a constant 19C.

Wax is being sprayed on the 16th century warship and the conservation process, which will end in 2016, can only be interrupted for four one-hour intervals a day.

Warings managing director Philippe Jouy said: ‘The museum will represent the very best in 21st century architecture and construction, providing a beautiful, secure environment for the finest collection of 16th century artefacts in the world.’