Jodie ready to dance with the stars in front of billions

Dance and drama teacher at Park Community School, Jodie Rodaway (24) from Waterlooville, has been volunteering at the Olympics and will be part of the closing ceremony.
Dance and drama teacher at Park Community School, Jodie Rodaway (24) from Waterlooville, has been volunteering at the Olympics and will be part of the closing ceremony.
Image: Pixabay (labelled for reuse)

Havant Borough Council scoops RSPCA award for its handling of stray dogs

0
Have your say

SHE’S enjoyed one of the best positions to watch the Olympic Games.

Now Jodie Rodaway is looking forward to taking part in the spectacle – by starring in Sunday’s closing ceremony.

The 24-year-old from Starina Gardens in Waterlooville has volunteered at the London 2012 Games and was fortunate enough to be near British athletes Greg Rutherford and Mo Farah when they were presented with their gold medals.

But it doesn’t end there. The dance and drama teacher at Park Community School will also be dancing in the closing ceremony.

‘I’m really excited,’ she said.

‘I feel lucky to be able to have two positions.’

For the past four months, Jodie has been rehearsing for this Sunday’s closing ceremony which is based around the theme of British music.

‘It’s different to the opening ceremony – it’s going to be an amazing experience,’ she said.

‘We had our dress rehearsal on Monday and it was amazing to see it come together. It’s incredible.

‘You all come off thinking this is going to be amazing and we are all part of it.

‘I always wanted to be part of the games.

‘Being a dancer you don’t get a bigger stage than three or four billion people who will be watching.

‘I’m not nervous now but I probably will be on Sunday.

‘I need the next challenge now but I don’t think anything will be as good as this.’

Greg Rutherford’s win in the long jump saw him receive his award on Sunday – and that was Jodie’s first ceremony she took part in.

She is part of the victory ceremonies team at the Olympics.

That means she’s responsible for escorting the medallists out to the podium and also has to brief them before they go out so they know what will happen.

‘It was really hard to keep back the emotions,’ she said.

‘It’s indescribable. Everyone was quite calm before we went outside.

‘But as soon as we went through the tunnel you just heard this huge volume of noise.

‘The whole crowd in the stadium were elated about it.

‘It was really hard to hold back the tears when the national anthem was played.

‘It’s been so much more than I thought it would be.

‘We are part of their experience of winning the medal. It’s actually the biggest part of their life and you’re a part of it.

‘They were really lovely.

‘They were just so thankful for our help and really gracious.’

Jodie is also going to be volunteering at the Paralympic games which start at the end of the month.

And after that, she is looking ahead to the Commonwealth games which takes place in Glasgow in two years time.