Katrice Lee family gets apology for mistakes

2005_life_truemissing REP: SF'Natasha Lee and sister Katrice please
2005_life_truemissing REP: SF'Natasha Lee and sister Katrice please
Ricardo Rodriguez, seven, on the minitrain Picture: Habibur Rahman (170915-97)

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THE head of the force investigating the disappearance of toddler Katrice Lee has apologised to her family and admitted mistakes were made in the original investigation.

Katrice was two years old in 1981 when she went missing from a NAAFI store in Paderborn, Germany, on her birthday.

Katrice’s mum Sharon, 59 and sister Natasha, 38, were with Gosport’s MP Caroline Dinenage and defence minister Mark Francois MP yesterday when they met Brigadier Bill Warren Provost Marshal Army, of the Royal Military Police, which is re-investigating Katrice’s case.

It comes after family and friends marched to Downing Street to demand the release of the original 1981 RMP files, as previously reported in The News.

Natasha said: ‘Obviously they’re still saying they won’t release the case files from 1981 because it’s still part of the ongoing investigation but the minister has promised to help us and support us.

‘The Bridgadier, the Provost Marshal, he stated that basically the 1981 investigation was bungled and there were many errors.’

Ms Dinenage said she welcomed Mr Francois’s involvement and that Brigadier Warren had admitted mistakes were made and apologised.

‘He admitted there were mistakes in the original investigation and he apologised for them and he said he would be prepared to do that publicly, which I think is a really important step for them,’ she said.

Both Natasha and Sharon were also given updates about the current investigation, including hearing that more than 100 people had contacted Crimewatch following an appeal last month.

And both were shown a timeline of events from the current investigation, which Mrs Lee corrected.

Brigadier Bill Warren refused to speak to The News as the meeting was private.