More agony for officer injured by a prisoner

COP INJURY  (EB) MRW  15/8/2012 ''David Jennings (45) a former detention officer at Waterlooville Police Station who was severely injured by a well known criminal who refused to be photographed after his arrest ''Picture: Malcolm Wells (122696-915)
COP INJURY (EB) MRW 15/8/2012 ''David Jennings (45) a former detention officer at Waterlooville Police Station who was severely injured by a well known criminal who refused to be photographed after his arrest ''Picture: Malcolm Wells (122696-915)
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A CIVILIAN detention officer whose career ended when he was attacked by a prisoner has warned other civilian staff to be on their guard as he endures further pain.

David Jennings was left disabled when his wrist was broken in three places by Christopher Clarke at Waterlooville police station in March 2006.

Clarke was later jailed and Mr Jennings, a father of two, had to be medically discharged from the force and he has not worked since.

Six years on Mr Jennings is still in excruciating pain and in the latest operation Mr Jennings has had bone from his hip grafted on to his right wrist fusing it so that it can never move again.

The radical operation was the last option left to doctors to try to stop the agony.

The 45-year-old, of Waterlooville, said: ‘The pain hasn’t eased yet but I’ve only had my stitches out two weeks ago. I’m still in a full cast.

‘I’m having therapy to try and move my fingers.

‘I may have to have further surgery in the future to have the pins and plates in my arm altered.’

Mr Jennings, who lost a claim for compensation from the force in April, said it could happen to other civilian staff put in similar situation.

‘I don’t want anyone else to go through what me and my family have been through,’ he said.

‘I would say to them be very, very careful what situations you put yourself in.

‘If you fear that you might be injured executing your duties in your place of work, don’t do it.’

Mr Jennings received several commendations from the force, one for overseeing work on the cells to make sure they were safe for prisoners and once for saving a prisoner who tried to take his own life.

He now survives on a pension and has had to move house because he was struggling to pay the rent.

He said: ‘What upsets me is that I’m severely disadvantaged now in the job market too. Hampshire Constabulary would not even consider redeploying me.’

A spokesman for the force said it could not comment on the case.