Portsmouth dancers try to break world record with tapathon

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  • Participants say it was tiring but fun
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FIFTY five pairs of feet tapped their way to a potential world record.

It was quite a spectacle as 55 dancers performed an intricate tap routine for eight minutes non-stop in a dance hall.

Young dancers at The Giselle Academy in Portsmouth have taken part in a record breaking tapathon for Children in Need. Picture Ian Hargreaves  (151858-2)

Young dancers at The Giselle Academy in Portsmouth have taken part in a record breaking tapathon for Children in Need. Picture Ian Hargreaves (151858-2)

They were just one group among hundreds across the country who were trying to break a world record for the most people tap dancing at the same time.

The feat was organised for Children in Need and youngsters at the Giselle Academy in North End, Portsmouth had been practising since September.

All the practice paid off and it was an effortless performance as people strutted their stuff to two back-to-back tracks of Bruno Mars’ Uptown Funk.

Gillian Creed, 43, from Paulsgrove, danced alongside her 12-year-old daughter Beatrice.

She said: ‘It brought back memories.

‘The last time I danced was over 20 years ago and also many years before that danced the world record breaking attempt at tap dancing by Roy Castle at the Royal Marine Barracks parade ground in Eastney.

‘It was actually really exciting.’

The tapathon raised £550 for Children In Need, but partipicants will have to wait to hear back from Guinness World Records to find out if they have made history.

Mykela Buckley-McGilp, 14, from Hilsea, said: ‘Doing it twice wears you out! It was good exercise.’

The day was organised by Karen Lee, stage manager at the school in Derby Road.

‘You get a real buzz and adrenaline rush,’ she said.

All the participants received a certificate and a round of applause for taking part.

School principal Cathie Ingram said: ‘There are so many children in war-torn countries that are not able to do dancing.

‘That’s why I think it’s so important to do fundraising through the Giselle Academy. It means some children somewhere will have their lives made a little bit better.’