Potential buyer says losing points would put him off

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SELF-PROCLAIMED multi-millionaire businessman Keith Gregory expressed his intent to take over Pompey – but wants to secure a deal ahead of tomorrow’s administration hearing.

Mr Gregory, a relative of former Pompey chairmen Jim and Martin Gregory, says he has no interest in the club once it goes into administration.

120497-159_BLACKPOOL_POMPEY_SR_11/2/12'Action from Blackpool vs Pompey at Bloomfield Road.'Pompey fans in defiant mood at Bloomfield Road.''Picture:Steve Reid (120497-159)

120497-159_BLACKPOOL_POMPEY_SR_11/2/12'Action from Blackpool vs Pompey at Bloomfield Road.'Pompey fans in defiant mood at Bloomfield Road.''Picture:Steve Reid (120497-159)

Pompey’s administration hearing will be held at the High Court in London tomorrow. Administration will lead to the club suffering a 10-point penalty in the Championship.

The 57-year-old said he is keen to secure a deal with Andrew Andronikou, who will become the club’s administrator when the application goes through.

Mr Andronikou has been acting as joint-administrator of Pompey’s parent company, Convers Sports Initiatives (CSI), since November.

The latest interested bidder told The News he is a successful international businessman in the leather industry and is based in Hampstead, London.

He said he owns ‘quite a lot of different companies’ but would not divulge which.

Mr Gregory said: ‘We are not coming in to take from Pompey. We are coming in with money and we have the money to turn the club around.

‘I want to talk to the administrators as soon as possible.

‘I will put my money into the club and it will go to where I take it. But if the club loses 10 points then I am not interested.’

He added he wants to buy Pompey for his son Alexander, 27, who he said is involved in organising chess tournaments.

‘He is one of the major people in chess tournaments and he is a big football fan,’ said Mr Gregory. ‘If Pompey give him a chance, this is exactly what they want.’

Jim Gregory owned Pompey from 1988 to 1994, when ill health forced him to step down. His son Martin, who was an unpopular figure among fans, became chairman before selling the club to Milan Mandaric in 1999.

Mr Gregory added: ‘People need to forget the name Gregory and I don’t respect Jim or Martin Gregory. I feel I can do the deal, get in and stop the 10 points deduction.’