Pubs praise a plan for late-night games

Flower show for autumn

0
Have your say

LANDLORDS have hailed a government plan to let pubs stay open later during the football World Cup in Brazil.

If approved, the plan would allow football fans to watch matches including England v Italy on June 14.

The game won’t start until 11pm and run after normal pub opening times.

Simon Haynes, landlord of the The Admiral Drake in Kingston Crescent, Portsmouth, said: ‘It’d be really good.

‘We’d like to show the games and we know people would like to stay and watch them.’

Nigel Tresidder, landlord of the Newcome Arms in Newcome Road, said: ‘It would be fantastic.

‘People could stay in the pub, have a drink, and soak up the atmosphere.

‘It would be great news for business.’

Home Secretary Theresa May said there would be a consultation on whether the government should make a national order to relax licensing hours.

Mrs May said the consultation would ask respondents whether licensing laws should be relaxed for England games nationally or whether to leave it as a local decision using the temporary event notice system.

She said the government wanted to strike a balance between the increased risk of crime and disorder from late-night drinking and ‘reducing the burden on those wishing to celebrate the World Cup’.

In a written statement, Mrs May said: ‘Any relaxation of licensing hours nationally during the Fifa World Cup would relate to the sale of alcohol for consumption on the premises and the provision of late-night refreshment in licensed premises at specified dates and times only.’

‘The government is mindful of the need to strike a balance between the risks that late-night drinking can lead to increased crime and disorder and public nuisance and reducing the burden on those wishing to celebrate the Fifa World Cup.

‘The consultation is therefore considering a number of issues, including the principle of relaxing licensing hours nationally during the World Cup, the dates and geographical extent that any licensing hours order may cover.’