‘Difficult position’ for women to stop jihadis

Archive picture of a  Free Syrian Army  soldier firing his machine gun against Syrian Army positions in the Izaa district of Aleppo, Syria.

Archive picture of a Free Syrian Army soldier firing his machine gun against Syrian Army positions in the Izaa district of Aleppo, Syria.

Portsmouth nightclub Pryzm has been granted an amended premises license to sell alcohol until 3am during the week.

Portsmouth nightclub granted late night alcohol licence during week despite police concerns

10
Have your say

MUSLIM women in the area are divided over police calls for them to help stop family members going to Syria.

Counter-terrorism police asked women to help stop people going to the war-torn country to fight.

It comes as two women from Portsmouth are understood to have travelled there to marry fighters.

Sumaiya Ahtia, 18, of Portsmouth, spoke to The News after Friday prayers yesterday. She said it is not women’s role to police their family.

‘It’s a difficult position for any woman to be in,’ she said.

‘I feel the government’s role in this whole Syria conflict is not a good stance whatsoever.

‘If someone goes to Syria for whatever reason they’d be branded as a terrorist, I don’t think that’s fair.

‘That’s not the government’s role to say that.

‘There’s so many young British men who go to Israel to fight in the Israeli Defence Force. They come back and no-one bats an eyelid.

‘I don’t agree with British Muslim men going over there and fighting. It’s not helping.’

As reported, a group of five men from the city left to fight with rebel forces against President Bashar al-Assad in the civil war raging in Syria.

And it is understood two women have gone to marry jihadi fighters in the country.

Ifthekar Jaman, 23, from Southsea, gave a television interview while in Syria fighting for the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant, before he died in battle in December.

His family home in Southsea was searched by counter-terrorism police this month.

No-one-was arrested and nothing was seized.

Muslim leaders in the city condemned those going to the country and have since warned against it.

Committee members at the Jami Mosque have worked with the city council to produce a leaflet warning people not to go.

Zainab Mutlaq, 44, of Portchester, spoke to The News after attending prayers at a mosque in the city.

She said: ‘Women should talk to their relatives and say not to go. We should help charity instead.’

She warned against Muslim women travelling to Syria.

She said: ‘It’s completely wrong – it’s wrong for men to go there, too.’

As reported yesterday, a woman who knew Jaman said family should play a role.

Back to the top of the page