Grand design plan mastermind is told Gosport home isn’t suitable

An artist's impression of how a former munition store in Gosport would look after being transformed into a three-bedroom eco home
An artist's impression of how a former munition store in Gosport would look after being transformed into a three-bedroom eco home
Fareham MP Suella Fernandes with members of Solent Waspi at her Senior Citizens Fair, in Fareham.

Solent Waspi campaigners attend Fareham fair

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THE man planning to convert an old munitions store into a home in Gosport has been told it is not suitable.

It comes as nearly 60 letters have been submitted objecting to the scheme off Britannia Way in Priddy’s Hard.

Alan Dawes wants to preserve the former cordite magazine and natural habitat surrounding it by developing it into an eco-home.

Residents fear Great Crested Newts and badgers in the fenced off site could be affected by any construction.

Mr Dawes said: ‘Fifty years from now or 100 years what’s the alternative if we don’t maintain these properties?

‘In 100 years you’ll still get Great Crested Newts and badgers. But in 100 years if you don’t have something done to the building you have damage and decay.’

It comes as the head of planning policy at Gosport Borough Council has written a report about the site.

The report concludes: ‘The potential developer is strongly advised that a residential development is not suitable for this location.’

A petition calling for the council to refuse permission has been signed by 16 people.

It says there is no community need for the three-bedroom home and natural habitation should be maintained.

The area is the designated Priddy’s Hard nature conservation site.

John Hudson, of Britannia Way, who is opposed to the family home, said few people have signed the petition as residents have submitted individual letters instead.

He said: ‘I would be extremely surprised if it were granted permission.

‘All of the residents bar one are extremely annoyed that he should try to do so.’

As reported, Mr Dawes bought the cordite magazine for £44,000 in May and the store near it was sold in February for £48,000.

But Mr Dawes has now said the sales came with a claw-back clause, meaning he will have to pay the original owner more if it is converted.

His agent has hit back at comments from objecting neighbours.

Katherine Stevens’s report said the access to the site will not be dangerous, that there is no evidence of badgers and only one tree will be felled for the development.

No decision has been made.