My parking ticket blew away and I got a £35 fine

Samantha Scott
Samantha Scott
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MOTORIST Samantha Scott was left fuming after getting a £35 parking fine despite having a ticket.

The bank worker had parked her car in a pay-and-display in Fareham and bought a ticket for £3.50.

But after putting it on the dashboard, it was blown off by the wind.

When Mrs Scott returned to her car later, she discovered she had been given a ticket.

The 43-year-old, of Mitchell Road, Havant, sent off an appeal letter to the council, but it fell on deaf ears.

She said: ‘They had observed my car from 5.12pm to 5.21pm and then they put the ticket on, which was fair enough.

‘I sent an email and said I had bought a ticket and explained what had happened but they said I still had to pay as this had happened once before to me 18 months ago.’

Mrs Scott now wants Fareham Borough Council to change the way it issues car parking tickets and said the council should look into ways of making them more secure to prevent other people from encountering the same problem.

‘If they just put some sticky on the back of it then this kind of thing would not happen,’ she said.

When contacted by The News, a spokesman from the council said they would look into Mrs Scott’s case.

Executive spokesman for public protection Cllr Trevor Cartwright said: ‘We have reviewed Mrs Scott’s case and her penalty charge notice has been cancelled.

‘However, I’d like to remind people using council car parks that they need to make sure that their ticket is displayed clearly and correctly before leaving their vehicle parked.’

Delighted with the result, Mrs Scott said she hoped the council would now look into a better way of issuing tickets and added: ‘I would encourage every member of the public to appeal a parking ticket they feel is unjust.’