Predictions on Corbyn, the EU, Syria and Trump

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It’s that time again for some new year predictions, which are, of course, great fun to think up but possibly a little cringeworthy come the year’s end.

It’s that time again for some new year’s predictions, which are, of course, great fun to think up but possibly a little cringe worthy come the year’s end.

Jeremy Corbyn – I think that the Labour leader will still be in his job at the end of 2016. Despite all the troubles he has with MPs and various Shadow Cabinet resignations and sackings, I don’t see how he can be ousted because he remains very popular with the party members who overwhelmingly voted for him. If there is a coup to relieve him of his power, Jeremy can simply stand again and I’m sure he will be voted in again.

EU referendum – I’m going to stick my neck out a little and say that there will be a referendum on Britain’s membership of the EU in 2016. Of course, the timing is one for the Prime Minister and I have no prior knowledge, but my gut feeling is that it will be sooner rather than later.

This is a massively important vote for the country and everyone is waiting to see what the PM can renegotiate with our EU partners over the next months.

Donald Trump – So I predict that Mr Trump will not be selected as the Republican candidate to fight this year’s presidential election. I think that the vast majority of American Republicans will sensibly decide that he is just too divisive to be in the running.

Who will win the election? Well, my prediction is Hilary Clinton, if she is nominated on the democratic ticket.

Syria – This human tragedy, I predict, will sadly continue this year despite the best efforts of the global community. The problems blighting the country are so complex, the situation so dire for its people and the fighting so bitter, I fear it will be many years before a lasting peace can be secured and the Syrians who have fled can finally go home.

Whatever the reasons for the present situation, I do support the Government in its desire to tackle Isil in Iraq and Syria. To do nothing for fear of the complexities is not a good reason for inaction.