Recycling roads could save authority £1m

SUPPORT Cllr Sean Woodward with Leon Churchill from Hampshire County Council and David Fawcett from Amey

SUPPORT Cllr Sean Woodward with Leon Churchill from Hampshire County Council and David Fawcett from Amey

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AN INNOVATIVE way of fixing roads that could save taxpayers up to £1m is being rolled out across Hampshire.

The plan is to reuse materials from existing roads and pavements for any new road improvements in the county.

Traditionally, tar has had to be disposed of at specially-licensed facilities because it is classed as a hazardous material.

This has been a barrier in the reuse of old road surfacing.

The scheme is headed by Hampshire County Council, its highways contractor Amey, and subcontractor Allasso Recycling.

Councillor Sean Woodward, who is in charge of transport, said: ‘The innovative way our highways service is using this material has huge potential. Financially, we can save money not only by using the recycled material instead of buying new, but also in the costs of disposal and transporting old material.

‘From an environmental perspective, with the material used consisting of 97 per cent recycled product, this has the potential to be a long-term, sustainable way of surfacing the roads.’

The recycled material is called Hydraulically Bound Material (HBM).

A recycling facility is being developed to deal with HBM and other recycled products from highway waste, generating opportunities for new jobs, and manufacturing up to 300 tonnes of material per hour.

Dave Trowell, director at Allasso Recycling Ltd, added: ‘The council should be applauded for having the foresight in considering the reuse of materials.’

David Ogden, account director at Amey, said: ‘We’re constantly looking at innovative ways to deliver a more efficient highways service.’

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