Residents voice fears over extra housing in Warsash

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From left, Lewis Teesdale, nine, Kalila Kenyatta, eight, Kiki Tautz, seven, Alfie Malcolm, 10, and Jace Delaney, eight, from Gomer Junior School Picture: David George

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WE NEED more infrastructure.

That is the message from residents of Warsash after a Community Action Team meeting about the draft local plan for Fareham last night.

John Chase, who attended the meeting, said: ‘The infrastructure needs to be sorted first.

‘I think Warsash is taking more than its fair share of the developments and the infrastructure we currently have will not support all these houses.’

Within the draft local plan, Warsash has been allocated 800 homes of the 3,300 needed across the borough.

Resident John Reed said: ‘The council has been given a quote and they have to fill it.

‘We can’t understand why our village is being totally urbanised and it makes more sense to develop to the north.’

The two main sites in Warsash feature 700 houses to the north and south of Greenaway Lane and 100 homes at the site of the Warsash Maritime Academy.

Locks Heath resident Paul Selby said: My children go to school at Brookfield Community.

‘Potentially these housing numbers could see another 1,400 children that need to find a school place.

‘Eight hundred houses means at least 1,600 vehicles which I think is a reserved estimate if families have teenagers who also have cars.

‘I know people need housing, but it should be dealt with in a different way.’

Leader of the council Sean Woodward and Director of Planning and Regulations Richard Jolley gave presentations of the draft local plan, with particular focus on Warsash sites.

Ward councillor Trevor Cartwright said: ‘Like my residents, I am totally against the developments.’

He added: ‘Our roads just cannot take any more cars.’