Sorry about my language – I’m from Portsmouth

Why should Angela Rayner be derided for her Stockportian accent? Picture: Lorne Campbell / Guzelian

BLAISE TAPP: We need more Angela Rayners at the top of British politics

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A COUNCILLOR who swore at a resident during a heated row put his outburst down to the fact he’s from Portsmouth.

Cllr Richard Denton-White used foul language against a man who confronted him after a meeting over plans to put up council tax in a Dorset borough.

Richard Denton-White

Richard Denton-White

Cllr Denton-White, of Portland Town Council, grew up in Bedhampton and Leigh Park and said it was part of his upbringing as a ‘Pompeian’ to defend himself.

Earlier on in the meeting, the councillor told another man in the front row to ‘shut it’ after he started provoking him.

Cllr Denton-White, 67, who said Pompey runs ‘in his blood’ said: ‘Portsmouth has got its own unique culture, no-one can deny that.

‘I was brought up in that environment where if someone got in your face, you tell them where to go.

‘Having said that, I do take on board if you are in public office, you should be above that and you shouldn’t react.

‘I still regard myself as a pompeian.

‘It’s in my blood that I am a Pompey fan until I die.

‘In those days, we were called Fratton Enders and that had a resonance in the football league.’

It comes after Cllr Eleanor Scott quit her post as a cabinet member for Portsmouth City Council after claiming its politics was too aggressive, and favoured men.

As reported, she is no longer a member of the Liberal Democrats group, but is still a Lib Dem councillor as part of her membership to the federal party.

Cllr Gerald Vernon-Jackson, leader of the council, said in the week that was the nature of local government, and he might perceive how things go differently because he is a man.

In response to his comments, Cllr Scott said: ‘I really am going through hell.

‘I have been put in the most horrible position and here we have the leader admitting to an aggressive, nasty and unpleasant culture as being the norm.

‘Who on earth flourishes in that kind of setting?

‘Why should staff in particular have to put up with it, witness it, or sometimes even be on the receiving end of it?

‘I’m surprised that senior officers haven’t got anything to say on what the leader describes as the aggressive, nasty and unpleasant culture.’