Primary schools celebrate as hard work boosts results

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Schools in Gosport and Fareham had good reason to cheer as figures rating the performance of primary schools were released today.

Key Stage Two results show that hundreds of 11-year-olds who sat their exams in May have moved into secondary schools with the expected level four in both maths and English.

The figures show 65 per cent of all schools in Fareham attained higher than national average results for the combined English and maths accreditation. And five out of 16 schools in the Gosport area could also lay claim to that achievement.

Brockhurst Junior School, in Avery Lane, Gosport, saw a hike in combined level four pass rates from 66 per cent last year to 77 per cent in 2010, putting the school above the 73 per cent average for England.

Paula Taylor-Williams, headteacher, said: 'We are absolutely delighted. It's down to a lot of hard work by the staff who work with these children.

'We have worked very closely to meet individual children's needs. Each half-term we met with the teachers for pupil progress. We always ask what more can we do and we ask what can we do to help children make more progress.'

Roxy Ashworth, acting deputy head at St Anthony's Catholic Primary School in Primate Road, Titchfield Common, which achieved a staggering 100 per cent pass rate in the combined subject, hopes to be one of the top schools in Hampshire.

She said: 'It was also down to the children themselves and their hard work because they completely got on board. We made sure we kept the curriculum broad, and we had lots of themes so the children didn't get bored. But we did do some practice of the tests as well so they weren't nervous when it came to the real thing.'

Bedenham Primary, in Bridgemary Avenue, Gosport, made a very commendable leap in combined English and maths level four passes from 53 to 67 per cent. Phil Laurie, deputy headteacher, said: 'We were really pleased to have made such a good improvement. I do believe a lot of this is down to a huge effort developing our curriculum to make it exciting and relevant to the real world. Our children are not working in a vacuum - they are improving their reading and literacy skills in scenarios they can relate to.

'For example our year three and fours borrowed money from the bursar to buy guinea pigs and they are working out how to pay him back, with interest!'