DCSIMG

Ride2Bury team see their hard work pays off

The cyclists who took part in the Ride2Bury challenge

The cyclists who took part in the Ride2Bury challenge

 

THEY cycled 300 miles and pedalled for four days in memory of a four-year-old boy.

Now the 20 cyclists who took part in the Ride2Bury challenge have seen their hard work pay off as they handed over television and games equipment to Southampton General Hospital.

The group raised money in memory of Jack Robinson (pictured), who died from a brain tumour at the beginning of April.

The team raised £23,500 over the four-day ride in April, which saw the group leave Fratton Park and arrive in Gigg Lane in Bury for Pompey’s final away match of the season.

They decided to split the funds between the children’s medical unit at Southampton General Hospital, Naomi House children’s hospice near Winchester, and Portsmouth-based charity Brain Tumour Research.

Organiser Tom Dearie said: ‘We originally organised the bike ride to raise money for Pompey’s 12th Man, which helps people who are going through a hard time attend matches at Fratton Park.

‘But when we heard about young Jack and the bravery he was showing in the face of his illness, we knew we had to do something to help, so decided half the money we raised would go to him.

‘The team was devastated when we found out he had died, but we knew we would carry on and do something in his memory.

‘Hopefully this donation of toys and games will help other children in Jack’s position, who have to stay in hospital for sometimes weeks at a time.

‘We were humbled by our experience at Southampton General, seeing the exemplary work the medical staff do to take care of the youngsters there who, like Jack, are so very brave. It’s been a huge honour to be able to do this for them in Jack’s memory.’

Ward manager Maureen Wiltshire added: ‘We just can’t thank them enough for the donation and, as the team saw when they visited, these televisions and games consoles will give actually life-changing experiences for the children in our care, some of whom are here for several weeks and even months.

‘It sounds corny, but we have been absolutely blown away by this, and we really just can’t praise them highly enough.’

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page