Skydiver jumps for Rowans Hospice to thank charity

David Malzard
David Malzard
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GRATITUDE for the care given to to a dying woman has prompted a Southsea man to jump out of a plane.

David Malzard, 44, fulfilled a lifelong ambition of doing a skydive to raise money for the Rowans Hospice.

David, who owns a hardware store, later presented a cheque for £548.22 to the Purbrook-based charity.

He said doing the skydive was one of the most exciting things he had ever done.

David said: ‘It was absolutely amazing.

‘We were going to go from 10,000ft, but we got up to about 13,000ft.

‘When they opened the door of the plane and there was a gust of wind you think, whoa, I’ve got to jump out now.

‘But then everyone in the plane was excited and I was smiling all the way, thumbs up.

‘Then the parachute came on and you could see all the buildings below – it was just lovely.’

David’s tandem skydive was made from Netheravon Airfield near Salisbury.

He said he did the jump to thank the Rowans, who cared for his grandma Gladys Claydon, who died in June aged 94.

Skydiving had also been a dream of David’s since he was a boy.

He said: ‘My grandma was in the Rowans at Purbrook for several months, and then when she became terminally ill, they put her into a care home in Fareham.

‘I wanted to do something for them because of the great care they gave her.

‘I was looking at the options and was thinking about abseiling down the 
Spinnaker Tower, but then I saw that 
you can skydive for them as well, so I thought, that’s something I’ve always wanted to do.’

David was one of 10 people who made the jump on the same day for the Rowans.

Amanda Mahoney, from the charity, said she was delighted about the donation.

Ms Mahoney said: ‘It’s thanks to the fundraising efforts of all of these brave people who take on challenges such as this that we are able to provide care and support to people affected by life-limiting illnesses in Portsmouth and south-east Hampshire’.