M27 motorway junction to face major changes if new town goes ahead

PLAN Sean Woodward speaking at last night's meeting and inset, the audience. Pictures: Allan Hutchings (112208-841 and 848)
PLAN Sean Woodward speaking at last night's meeting and inset, the audience. Pictures: Allan Hutchings (112208-841 and 848)

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IF PLANS for up to 7,500 new homes at north Fareham go ahead a motorway junction is likely to be closed to private vehicles.

At a community action team meeting for Fareham town last night, councillor Sean Woodward, the leader of Fareham Borough Council revealed that junction 10 of the M27 would probably be radically altered.

PLAN The audience at last night's meeting.   Picture: Allan Hutchings (112208-848)

PLAN The audience at last night's meeting. Picture: Allan Hutchings (112208-848)

Cllr Woodward was at the meeting to give a presentation and take questions about the proposals for the controversial new town north of Fareham.

In response to a question about how the road network would be able to cope with thousands of extra vehicles, Cllr Woodward said that the A32 to and from Wickham would most likely be diverted across to junction 11.

And the existing junction 10 would then be used solely by the bus rapid transit (BRT) scheme. The first stage of the BRT is being constructed along the disused railway between Fareham and Gosport.

Cllr Woodward said: ‘This is an important discussion, but it’s one for the next stage.

‘My first preferred option was to have junction 10 become an all-direction junction and I was told that the cost of doing that would be in the region of £80m.

‘Every thousand homes usually provides about £10m in infrastructure from developers and I would like to see this development provide more than one junction.’

News of the plans drew disapproving shouts from the audience of more than 100 people who had packed the hall at Neville Lovett School.

Cllr Woodward also said that the new development would create as many jobs as there were houses.

But when it was questioned how this would stop people from commuting or putting extra burden on the roads, he said: ‘At the moment we don’t have a Soviet-style system, thankfully, where you are told: “That’s where you work, that’s where you live and that’s where you will ride your tractor.” We can’t control that.’

He also added that it was ‘almost an urban myth’ that the South East Plan, the document which originally stated the need for 80,000 homes in south Hampshire, had already been abolished.

The new homes are a major part of the council’s plans for how the borough will grow in the next 20 years. It is waiting for the verdict of an inspector who held a public inquiry last month.

His response is expected in the middle of July.