Tricorn sign’s star attraction at Paul’s shop

120218_TRICORN_19/01/12''Paul Anderson has fixed a sign from the Tricorn shopping centre to the ceiling of his shop in Charlotte Street, Portsmouth. 'He bought the sign at auction and is now displayed at Andy's Ex Government Surplus Stores in Charlotte Street. ''Picture: Allan Hutchings(120218-764)

120218_TRICORN_19/01/12''Paul Anderson has fixed a sign from the Tricorn shopping centre to the ceiling of his shop in Charlotte Street, Portsmouth. 'He bought the sign at auction and is now displayed at Andy's Ex Government Surplus Stores in Charlotte Street. ''Picture: Allan Hutchings(120218-764)

0
Have your say

PEOPLE are flocking to a Portsmouth antique shop to see an iconic part of the city’s history.

One of only three remaining original signs from the city’s demolished Tricorn Shop Centre is now displayed on the ceiling of Andy’s Maritime Antiques, in Charlotte Street.

The store’s owner, Paul Anderson, bought the sign at an auction in Nesbits, Southsea, for £420.

He had hoped to put it on the back wall of his shop, which is opposite the spot where the centre used to stand, but it was too big.

‘Loads of people have been coming into the shop to look at it,’ he said.

‘It’s mostly older people who used to work in the Tricorn in the 60s and 70s and they all have so many memories of it.

‘You wouldn’t think it had such a following but people are nostalgic about it.

‘Some have even came all the way down from London to see it. It’s creating a real buzz about the shop.’

Paul’s is the only original sign which belongs to a member of the public.

The second has been donated to City Museum and will be on display during a Tricorn exhibition in 2014. And the third is in a state of disrepair.

Mr Anderson, who used to shop in the centre as a youngster, added: ‘It’s an important part of Portsmouth’s history, so it feels special to own it.

‘But the most important thing is that it’s back in Charlotte Street where it was first put up, and where it belongs.’

Paul bought a copy of an original brochure about the centre, a couple of pamphlets and a Schedule of Rents and Floor Areas for the shop units at the auction. He plans to frame them and put on the shop walls.

The Tricorn, famously voted one of Britain’s ugliest buildings, was demolished in 2004.

Back to the top of the page