WATCH: Railway trespassers dice with death in footage released by police

British Transport Police has released shocking footage of near-miss encounters of trespassers on railway lines to warn people of the dangers. Picture: British Transport Police
British Transport Police has released shocking footage of near-miss encounters of trespassers on railway lines to warn people of the dangers. Picture: British Transport Police

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Police have released shocking CCTV footage showing several near misses on our railway lines to warn people of the dangers of trespassing.

According to the British Transport Police, 170 people have lost their lives trespassing on the railway in the last 10 years, and almost half of those killed were under 25.

In the South East, 1,118 people were caught trespassing on railway lines last year – a figure which has risen by a quarter since 2012 and is the third-highest for any area the UK.

The biggest danger is being struck by a train, followed by electrocution, according to Network Rail.

The force is asking parents to speak to their children about the dangers of going on the tracks as part of an ongoing campaign to tackle trespassing.

A spokesman said: ‘Most trespassers say taking a shortcut was their main motivation, followed by thrill-seeking. But walking along or messing around on the tracks can result in serious life-changing injuries or death.

‘We’re doing all we can to keep people safe by patrolling areas we know where trespass is likely to happen and stopping people from getting on to the railway.

‘We’re also working closely with Network Rail and train operators to reduce trespass by improving security across the network, using covert surveillance to catch offenders and going into schools to warn children of the dangers of trespassing.

‘But we can’t tackle this issue alone. We’re urging parents and young people to take a reality check when it comes to trespass. It’s not a game: they are real tracks, with real trains and real life-changing consequences.’