Woolly arrival is a sign of spring as sunshine finally breaks through

The newborn lambs at Staunton Country Park.   Picture: Ian Hargreaves  (111005-2)
The newborn lambs at Staunton Country Park. Picture: Ian Hargreaves (111005-2)
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THIS is one of the lovely lambs that arrived at a children’s farm – and with it comes the promise of a week of glorious spring weather.

The woolly triplets have arrived at Staunton Country Park in what is traditionally seen as a sign that spring has sprung.

They are getting used to life at the farm as the Met Office promises the sunshine is here at last with temperatures expected to reach 63F (17C) this week. Liana Norman from the Staunton’s farm team, said: ‘This is always quite an exciting time of year for us.

‘It will be all go for us through to Easter with lots of newborns on the way. Spring is definitely here for us.

‘Our ewe is doing well, but one of the lambs is having to be bottle-fed as it was born a little weaker than the others and mum has rejected him. But they’re out there in the courtyard for everyone to see.’

The three, pictured on page 1, will all be kept at the park but have not yet been named so the park is welcoming suggestions from the public. To suggest names, email staunton.park@hants.gov.uk

And there’s good news on the weather front – forecasters say it the sun should be sticking around for a little while yet. It comes as clocks go back on Sunday, bringing lighter evenings. Met Office forecaster Barry Gromett said: ‘The average for this time of year is about 11C, so we’re punching well above our weight at the moment.

‘In sheltered areas on the south coast it should be feeling nice indeed.

‘The wind could take the edge off, but there’s a big high pressure sitting over the country right now and essentially it’s looking good all week.

‘The start of next week is still looking good too, possibly even better.

‘For the foreseeable future it looks like there’s plenty of dry weather.’