Fareham Library throws party to thank its summer volunteers

Volunteer co-ordinator Liz Hole, library team manager Mandy Watmough, Summer Reading Challenge champion Louise Wilson, and library assistant Hazel Nicholls with Fareham Library's volunteers

Picture: Danny Randon
Volunteer co-ordinator Liz Hole, library team manager Mandy Watmough, Summer Reading Challenge champion Louise Wilson, and library assistant Hazel Nicholls with Fareham Library's volunteers Picture: Danny Randon

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A LIBRARY went above and beyond to recognise its team of summer volunteers with a party last night.

Fareham Library attracted a team of 53 people of all ages to help with its annual Summer Reading Challenge.

The volunteers pledged a staggering 540 hours to enlighten young bookworms on the benefits of the library.

Library team manager Mandy Watmough said: ‘The Summer Reading Challenge was a massive success this year and we couldn’t have done it without the volunteers who’ve helped.

‘They manned a reading desk so children could come and talk about the books they’d read one-on-one with somebody. They’ve been fantastic.’

As well as treating the volunteers to a buffet and quiz, the library gave its volunteers thank-you cards and certificates.

One of the many volunteers this year was Hazel Rowe, a regular contributor to several of the library’s activities.

Hazel, 54, and her husband David volunteer each month for the home library service, delivering books to elderly people across Hampshire.

David, 58, said: ‘I enjoy choosing books for other people with different tastes from mine. It broadens my horizons a bit, and I enjoy it when they enjoy the books I’ve chosen for them!’

Hazel added: ‘I think volunteering in Fareham Library is absolutely vital.’

Fourteen-year-old Isobel Hopley, was one of the youngest first-time volunteers this year.

She said: ‘I wanted to do something for the library because I enjoyed spending time here when I was younger and I liked helping out at the school library.

‘Opportunities like this, where you can get rewarded for reading, make kids want to read books more than just going on their phones.’

Daniel Price, 19, thought he would keep himself busy in his summer break from studying history at university.

He said: ‘I remember when I took part in the challenge when I was younger and I’ve still got all my medals.

‘I wanted to help children learn and read some books, but I was also learning skills that I could use myself, so it is a two-way process.’