Community turns out in force for Havant fundraiser

Dee Treadwell and Stephen Hider with baby Albert Treadwell, who needs a corrective helmet for his skull condition   Picture: Mick Young (161154-02)
Dee Treadwell and Stephen Hider with baby Albert Treadwell, who needs a corrective helmet for his skull condition Picture: Mick Young (161154-02)

Woman sprayed with unknown substance during burglary

  • Baby Albert was born with a rare head condition
  • His family had to pay thousands for a special helmet
0
Have your say

HUNDREDS of families flocked to a fun day in aid of a baby who was born with a rare condition.

Baby Albert, who is nine months today, has plagiocephaly – otherwise known as flat head syndrome – meaning one side of his head is misshapen, usually because of continuous pressure to one spot.

‘Albert was first diagnosed as having a severe case but in the four months that he’s been wearing it, that has changed to mild and is getting better all of the time.’

Dee Treadwell

Dee Treadwell and StephenHider were forced to fork out £1,950 for a privately-fitted custom helmet to correct the shape of Albert’s head after learning that the apparatus was not available on the NHS.

To recoup some of the money they paid out of their own pocket, the family held a fundraiser in St Francis Church, Leigh Park and had a range of activities from a bouncy castle and a tombola.

The helmet, which Albert wears 23 hours a day, has already made a significant difference.

Dee said: ‘Today was really just about making as much money as possible for the helmet and we’re really pleased with the turn-out.

‘Albert is now used to wearing the helmet and actually misses it when he doesn’t have it on – although he does have a good scratch when it is off.

‘We knew that he needed the helmet as it could affect him later in life.

‘If he wanted to wear a bike or motorcycle helmet, he would not be able to.

‘Without the helmet, he wouldn’t be as far ahead as he would be today.

‘It has made a big difference to him.

‘Albert was first diagnosed as having a severe case but in the four months that he’s been wearing it, that has changed to mild and is getting better all of the time.’

The couple are now set to campaign to get the helmets available on the NHS or at least at a discounted price.

Stephen said: ‘We’re lucky that we were able to pay for the helmet, although it has taken a bit of cutting back.

‘You know what kids can be like at school – they can be nasty, which we worried about.

‘We now want the NHS to start at least making a contribution to children who need the helmet.

Dee added: ‘It doesn’t make sense how breast implants can be done on the NHS but the helmet can’t.

‘We would really like to thank everyone who has contributed to us.’