NOSTALGIA: Walker Brothers, Humperdinck and Hendrix for less than 65p

St Alban’s Church before the Second World War when the church was severely bombed
St Alban’s Church before the Second World War when the church was severely bombed
Liza Bailey and her daughter Helen Bailey took part in Small Business Saturday last year at their florist shop Seaside Florist on Hayling Island.

Picture: Malcolm Wells

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No doubt many went to the Victorious festival on Southsea common over the bank holiday weekend.

But I wonder if the modern singers came up to the standard of the line-up, below, on stage at Portsmouth Guildhall in 1967.

The fabulous line up at the Portsmouth Guildhall in 1967

The fabulous line up at the Portsmouth Guildhall in 1967

Some of the Walker Brothers’ many hits are still played today, including The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine Anymore, Make It Easy On Yourself and Stay With Me Baby.

They were followed on stage by Cat Stevens whose hits included Matthew and Son, Wild World and Morning Has Broken.

Following him was the one and only Jimi Hendrix who I saw at the Isle of Wight pop festival.

He sang The Wind Cried Mary and Purple Haze.

Bob Hind

Many thought the lyrics went, ’Scuse me, while I kiss this guy’ – very shocking for 1967.

The lyrics were in fact, ‘Scuse me, while I kiss the sky.’

Following Jimi was special guest Engelbert Humperdinck whose melodic titles The Last Waltz and Spanish Eyes were a complete contrast in musical style to Jimi. I wonder what the audience reaction was.

You could see all these stars for less than 65p.

Portsmouth High School for Girls before the First World War. (Robert James collection)

Portsmouth High School for Girls before the First World War. (Robert James collection)

n During the Second World War St Alban’s Church in Copnor Road was hit by bombs from a plane flown by a Luftwaffe pilot.

Shortly after, the pilot was shot down and crashed close to Hilsea Station.

In the photo, below, we see the church as it was before the war.

n I love reading the words on old postcards.

Portsdown & Horndean car at Cosham. (Barry Cox collection)

Portsdown & Horndean car at Cosham. (Barry Cox collection)

Some long-gone and forgotten person writing personal sentiments.

Below, I have included the writing from someone who lived at Langstone Lodge, Milton Park, Portsmouth, on March 23, 1914.

The postcard was written just months before the outbreak of the First World War.

Unfortunately the final part of the message has disappeared so we’ll never know who Lisa’s friend was.

n Seen at Cosham long before modern road layouts, below, we see a car from Horndean about to join the tracks to Portsea Island proper.

Fort Widley overlooks the scene from Portsdown Hill.