Portsmouth pupil praised by royalty for his America’s Cup trophy design

Zak Kay, 10, who designed the trophy this year Picture: Paul Jacobs (160270-58)

Zak Kay, 10, who designed the trophy this year Picture: Paul Jacobs (160270-58)

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A BUDDING young artist from Paulsgrove who created the winner’s trophy for the America’s Cup World Series has received royal praise.

Zak Kay, 10, was congratulated by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge for his winning design for this weekend’s contest.

The St Paul’s Catholic Primary School pupil beamed as he met Kate and William while they were given a tour of Land Rover BAR’s headquarters, in Old Portsmouth, yesterday.

When he asked William what his son Prince George had received for his birthday on Friday, the Duke replied: ‘I am not telling, he got too many things, he’s far too spoilt.’

He added: ‘He’s not into boats yet.’

Speaking after the royal encounter, Zak’s mum, Kelly Kay, said: ‘I don’t think words can explain how proud I am of Zak.

‘He was hugely excited to meet Kate and I was really, really excited and proud of him. I could cry. He is very talented and hopefully this will help boost his confidence.’

Zak managed to beat scores of other children from the city with his bright design.

The trophy, shaped like the sails of an iconic AC45 and adorned with the star and crescent emblem of Portsmouth, was revealed as the winning design earlier this month.

His entry was chosen by a judging panel including official artist-in-residence of British America’s Cup team Land Rover BAR, Jeremy Houghton, sailor and 1851 Trust ambassador David Carr, and editor of The News Mark Waldron.

Kelly said the victory had really boosted her son’s confidence and added this weekend’s bonanza had been a proud moment for the city.

‘This America’s Cup event is absolutely brilliant for Portsmouth,’ she said.

‘It really shows off our beautiful sights and hopefully it’s encouraging kids to do more.’

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