So much art and culture in our seaside city

Columnist Alana Hebenton
Columnist Alana Hebenton
Liza Bailey and her daughter Helen Bailey took part in Small Business Saturday last year at their florist shop Seaside Florist on Hayling Island.

Picture: Malcolm Wells

Portsmouth council backs Small Business Saturday with free parking

0
Have your say

Our columnist Alana Hebenton works in PR and lives in Southsea. Here she talks about all the cultural gems Portsmouth has to offer.

Now, I don’t know much about art but I know what I like…and I definitely like Portsmouth.

Long known for its rich naval heritage, our seaside city also has a lot of arts and culture to offer.

First up you’ve got the museums.

Not quite as famous as its London namesake, but just as entertaining, there is Portsmouth’s Natural History Museum.

Nestled behind Canoe Lake, here you’ll find a range of fun and interesting exhibitions, as well as an actual butterfly house and beehive!

For fascinating war history there is the D-Day Museum on the seafront and if you fancy getting your cultural fix closer to the centre of town you can’t go wrong with the Portsmouth Museum.

While you’re down that way, you should take a trip to Gunwharf too.

Not for the shops, however, if you did accidentally find yourself in Karen Millen or Michael Kors it wouldn’t be the end of the world.

But instead because Gunwharf is also home to the deliciously diverse Aspex gallery.

This hidden gem delivers a beautiful mix of interesting, exciting, playful, challenging, thoughtful and creative new contemporary art.

At Aspex you’ll experience everything from new up-and-coming artists to established geniuses.

Adding a bit of show to the city, there are the fantastically entertaining Kings Theatre and New Theatre Royal.

First opening its doors, in 1907, Kings Theatre, in Albert Road, Southsea, is a magnet for theatregoers.

The theatre provides musicals, plays, comedy, opera, dance, talks and film in a Grade II listed proscenium arch theatre.

Equally impressive, the New Theatre Royal started life on High Street, in Old Portsmouth, back in 1761 where it was mentioned in Dickens’ Nicholas Nickleby.

The theatre reopened in its current location, Guildhall Walk, in 1854, when traveling circus owner Henry Rutley became licensee of the White Swan and leased the Landport Hall next to it, hoping to create ‘a place of entertainment’.

And this is something I can definitely vouch for.

If you feel like getting your hands dirty with a little arts and crafts yourself, Castle Street in Southsea has Arty Potz.

No experience needed, this local paint-your-own pottery studio caters for any age, from one to 100, with lots of tools and tips to help you on your way and give you some inspiration.