Black and white beauty

The Scallop, Aldeburgh, by Lucy Kayne
The Scallop, Aldeburgh, by Lucy Kayne
The Rampant at the ramparts of Portchester Castle in 1967. L to r: Peter Richardson (aka Ritchie Peters  they turned his name around) vocals, Ron Hughes guitar, Ken Hughes (his brother) drums, Don Golding bass, Mick Cooper Hammond organ.

NOSTALGIA: Still Rampant after all these years – the band that just keep giving...

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Gosport photographic artist Lucy Kayne started out in 2001, when she got her first Single Lens Reflex camera.

She remembers: ‘The camera gradually became an accessory that was hard to put down. It became an extension of me, a new way of seeing the world around me, an extra set of eyes that could capture a moment in time and freeze it forever.

‘It amazed me, that not only could I document my life in such a detailed manner but that I could also capture the beauty in the every day.

‘It made me see things in objects and scenes that I would normally walk past. It made me look at everything in terms of a photograph. A brick wall became a study of lines and shadow, a tree trunk became a macro world of peaks and troughs, a puddle revealed a world of reversed reflections.’

Lucy prefers Monochrome images. She continues: ‘Although colour helps objects relate to each other, having colour in a photograph steers the mind away from looking deeper into an object. Look closely at an object and try to see it as a monochrome image. Patterns will leap out at you, shadows and light will come to the fore and you will see detail that you may never have seen before.’

n See her new exhibition, Darkness to Light: Seeking Beauty in the Mundane, at the Kings Theatre in Southsea from Monday to Sunday next week. Viewing is free to the public from 10.30am to 2pm on Thursday and Saturday.