REVIEW: The Intern (12A) ***

Robert De Niro and Anne Hathaway link up in The Intern. PA Photo/Francois Duhamel/Warner Bros
Robert De Niro and Anne Hathaway link up in The Intern. PA Photo/Francois Duhamel/Warner Bros
An image from video game Call of Duty WWII

VERITY LUSH: Advert for war game shown before Dunkirk is sickening

0
Have your say

In an increasingly impersonal age, which gauges success by page impressions and numbers of followers on social media platforms, boardrooms are being led by young, ambitious tech-savvy entrepreneurs, who made their first millions when they were still at university.

One world-changing app or website, and these high-fliers look forward to a financially comfortable retirement well before the first buds of a mid-life crisis blossom.

The wisdom and experience of an older generation, who toiled for decades before the first modem crackled noisily to life, are often overlooked in this global marketplace.

Filmmaker Nancy Meyers reminds us that there is life after 60 in The Intern, a frothy exploration of romantic travails set in the offices of a thriving dot-com fashion business.

Bridging the divide between the old-fashioned ideals of a bygone era and the relentless 24-hour bombardment of information of the present day.

Ben Whittaker (Robert De Niro) is struggling to get to grips with the gentle ebb and flow of life following the death of his wife.

Tearful self-discovery is accessorized with broad humour, and De Niro and Hathaway catalyse a winning screen partnership.

To keep his mind active, Ben applies for a senior citizen internship at a flourishing Brooklyn-based company founded by workaholic, Jules Ostin (Anne Hathaway).

As Ben settles into his new role, he befriends Jules’ overworked personal assistant Becky (Christina Scherer), her husband Matt (Anders Holm).

He also makes a big impression on in-house masseuse Fiona (Rene Russo), sowing the seeds of a tender romance.

When Jules’ position as CEO comes under threat, Ben provides emotional support in a time of crisis and teaches his boss that success shouldn’t always come at the expense of personal relationships.

Tearful self-discovery is accessorized with broad humour, and De Niro and Hathaway catalyse a winning screen partnership.

A hysterical centrepiece sequence, rammed with Ocean’s Eleven references, suggests you’re never too old to break the law.