Brother and Bones pack more bite than your typical Cornish pasty

Brother and Bones

Brother and Bones

Shakin' Stevens. Picture by Graham Flack

Shakin’ Stevens: ‘Performing is how I started – singing is in my blood’

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As the old saying possibly doesn’t go, you can take the boy out of Cornwall...

Rich Thomas is frontman of the rising rockers Brother and Bones, who originally hails from the West Country but now, along with the rest of his bandmates, calls London home.

‘I’ve been living up here for about four years now,’ he says. ‘I’m from St Ives, it’s still home, but it’s kind of hard doing things from there. I don’t think I would consider us a London band, but it’s home-from-home – we’ve still got pasties in the blood.’

With their self-titled debut album newly-released, the five-piece are back on the road with their music which blends rock riffs, tribal drumming and more than a hint of folk.

It’s a sound that saw Classic Rock magazine describe them as ‘the new Pearl Jam.’

‘We take it as a massive compliment that people will put us in that kind of bracket,’ explains Rich.

I’m into acoustic guitar players John Martyn and Nick Drake, but we all listen to Rage and Zeppelin and those kind of bands, and this is how it ends up

Rich Thomas, frontman of Brother and Bones

‘We haven’t really set out to emulate or replicate anyone. I’ve always loved Pearl Jam, but they’ve never been at the forefront of my musical upbringing.

‘It’s funny how the combination of the things that inspire you and the things that influence you – you’re not actively involved in that process of choosing what influences you.

‘I’m into acoustic guitar players John Martyn and Nick Drake, but we all listen to Rage and Zeppelin and those kind of bands, and this is how it ends up.’

The band also boasts a pair of drummers in its line-up, Yiannis Sachinis and Robin Howell-Sprent, which helps with the bombast – but also in their quieter moments.

‘As well as being able to really go there with the bigger side of our dynamic it gives us more dexterity with our more quiet moments – we have that percussion like shakers, tambourines, djembe, there’s a lot of different textures.

‘It’s a nice element to the sound and something I hope that’s a bit different’.

Even though the new album is only just out, the band is already looking ahead: ‘It’s been kind of a strange year, we’ve always toured relentlessly, but this year we’ve put that on hold a bit and put all our plans post-summer, and been writing some new stuff – which seems weird to say when we’re only just about to release our first album.

‘This is like a bookmark in the musical chapter of our lives, we wanted to get it out so it’s a representative body of work.’

Catch them at Talking Heads in Southampton on Monday, or at Komedia in Brighton the following night. Tickets £10 both nights.

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