Review: The Move at the Kings Theatre, Southsea

The Move - original members Trevor Burton, left, and Bev Bevan, centre, with Phil Tree                   PICTURE: www.themove-live.com
The Move - original members Trevor Burton, left, and Bev Bevan, centre, with Phil Tree PICTURE: www.themove-live.com
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Psychedelia faded to grey, flower power withered, and the world moved on but, nearly half a century on, The Move are still rocking.

Founder members Bev Bevan and Trevor Burton are back on the road paying tribute to times past, minus old pals Roy Wood (otherwise engaged) and the late, lamented Carl Wayne.

The Move hold a special place in pop’s pantheon, defining an era with the first record played on Radio One, and providing the roots for a rock family tree that branched out into Wizzard, The Moody Blues, the Steve Gibbons Band, and the mighty Electric Light Orchestra.

Bev and Trevor, ably supported by Phil Tree and Tony Kelsey, rocked the Kings with a set that included all The Move’s greatest hits and more.

Psychedelic treasures I can Hear the Grass Grow and Flowers in the Rain appeared early on and the set panned out to include numbers by the Byrds, Jimi Hendrix and the Spencer Davies Group, all lapped up by an eager audience.

Vocals were not the strongest point, being too low in the mix for my liking, but Burton is a great guitarist and Bevan and the band could give many youngsters a run for their money.

Bevan also regaled the crowd with tales of the rock ‘n’ roll life, mingling with the heroes and driving on Route 66.

Before a blistering finale of Gimme Some Lovin, we heard excellent renditions of Do Ya, California Man and the excellent chart-topper Blackberry Way.

Nostalgic, certainly, but music energetically played by high-calibre musicians who deserve their special place in rock’s back catalogue.

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