Southsea Fest hits the right note

SWEAT Caves singer Lou Hanman in action at The One Eyed Dog. (113313-447)
SWEAT Caves singer Lou Hanman in action at The One Eyed Dog. (113313-447)
Wolf Alice

Wolf Alice present Visions Of A Life in all its variety

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It’s the one music festival where even if it rains, you know you won’t be getting muddy.

Two-and-a-half-thousand music fans gathered at 15 stages to see more than 100 acts perform at this year’s fifth Southsea Fest.

BROTHERS Jake and Elwood Blues drive the Blues Mobile along Albert Road during Southsea Fest. (113313-009)

BROTHERS Jake and Elwood Blues drive the Blues Mobile along Albert Road during Southsea Fest. (113313-009)

Centred around the Albert Road area, from punk at the Deco in Elm Grove to poetry at the Magick Bean cafe, comedy in the Wine Vaults and all sorts of music at the other venues, including The Wedgewood Rooms and Little Johnny Russells, there was plenty to keep people happy.

Rusty Sheriff, 31, from Oxford Road in Southsea, played drums with Aeroplane Attack! at the One Eyed Dog.

He said: ‘It’s all about local talent with a few friends from out of town thrown in.

‘It’s a lot of good friends coming together and having a really good time.

‘I’ve known a lot of these guys for 10 years or so in the other bands and helping to organise it – there’s a real family ethic.

‘There’s lots of other bands I want to see, but you can never plan it, and that’s one of the endearing qualities of it, you go with the flow.’

Student Emily Lambe, 20, of Marmion Road, was there with a big group of friends and said: ‘This is my third year – I love the variety, you can see whatever kind of music you want with so many different bands. I’m from Essex originally and there’s just nothing like this where I live.’

Creative writing student Peter Campbell, 21, from Castle Road, added: ‘It’s all about the atmosphere and the people and there’s a big old variety of bands.

‘I’ve been before but this year I was really drawn in by the poetry and we’ve got a few friends in bands that are playing as well.’

And some had come from further afield – Lindsay West, 28, came from Surrey to perform solo at The Globe pub and then later with her band Matthew and the Atlas at the Kings Theatre.

She said: ‘This is my first time here. I’ve never been to this town before but it’s really nice and the theatre is beautiful, I’m glad we got to play there.’

Her parents also came along for the day and mum Morna West added: ‘We don’t get the chance to see her play very often, so we thought we would come along as well and make a day of it.

‘You get a real feel for the community here.’

Some money raised from the day goes to the Ellen MacArthur Trust.