Swedes show their colours

Sad Day For Puppets
Sad Day For Puppets
Tigers Jaw

Tigers Jaw put a positive spin on their new life as a duo

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If you are into walls of shimmering guitars, melodies of intertwined feedback and waves of harmonized ethereal vocals, then Sad Day For Puppets are a band for you.

The typically-Swedish indie-rockers released their aptly-titled second album, Pale Silver & Shiny Gold, in September, just over a year after their acclaimed debut, Unknown Colors.

At a mere 37 minutes, it is much more focused and concise than their first release.

And, as the crows that have replaced the finches on the band’s logo seem to indicate, it’s also a much darker and heavier album, which is perhaps a result of touring extensively with A Place To Bury Strangers.

Sad Day For Puppets were formed in 2006 in the Stockholm satellite town of Blackeberg, the setting for the acclaimed vampire book/film Let The Right One In.

The focal point of the band is singer Anna Eklund, who leans on Marcus Sandgren’s ringing and fuzzy chords.

While songwriter Martin Källholm claims to be inspired by Thin Lizzy, Cheap Trick, Kiss and Aerosmith and is strangely obsessed with Bette Midler.

But most of the band’s influences can be traced back to the early 1990, when they all were teenagers. This period has made its mark on the band, which is where the shimmering guitars come from.

Regardless of how it happened, Pale Silver & Shiny Gold is something of a minor-key masterpiece.

It opens with the mournful Sorrow, Sorrow, which sees Anna joined by her sister Annika for some beautiful harmonies.

This gives way to Such A Waste, which takes the overt J Mascis references of their debut and shifts them into overdrive.

It’s not all heaviness and misery though – Touch is pure indie-pop.

See for yourself when the band arrive at the Cellars at Eastney on Thursday from 7.30pm

n Tickets cost £7 on the door or £6 in advance from the Cromwell Road box office, (023) 9282 6249 or stiffpromotions.co.uk.