Review: 9 to 5 The Musical, The Mayflower

Bonnie Langford with the company of 9-5 The Musical. Picture: Simon Annand
Bonnie Langford with the company of 9-5 The Musical. Picture: Simon Annand
Sir Bruce Forsyth has died aged 89

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It seems leapfrogging desks, spinning on chairs and belting out tunes does wonders for an office atmosphere.

Song and dance certainly does the trick for the characters in this workplace setting.

That and a few death threats.

This is 1980 and these office workers don’t exactly enjoy equality – until they turn the typewriters on their bigoted boss in outrageous fashion.

The musical stays fairly faithful to the film.

It’s easy to expect a bright, frothy offering of corn. What you get is a bright, frothy measure of wit, well-acted farce, retro references and excellent choreography.

Of course it has the mark of the queen of country and sass all over it. Creator Dolly Parton only appears as a video announcer but her personality is ever-present.

The action slows in the second half and it all becomes too tidy and sentimental.

But the fun continues with that title tune – anthem of the dispirited, the downtrodden and the ultimately optimistic.