REVIEW: Tangomotion at New Theatre Royal, Portsmouth

The music of Tangomotion took the lead
The music of Tangomotion took the lead
Promise and Promiscuity

REVIEW: Promise & Promiscuity at The Ashcroft Arts Centre, Fareham

0
Have your say

As any fan of Strictly Come Dancing knows, the Argentine Tango is one of the steamiest dance styles around.

But it’s as much about the music as the movement, which Tango Siempre set out to prove on Friday night.

Tangomotion is a music concert with dance, not, as she expected, a dance show with live music a la Strictly

The four-piece band – keyboard, double bass, violin and an Argentinian accordion called a bandoneon – took the audience on a sonic journey from the golden age of tango in the 40s and 50s to the dance salons of today. Accompanying them were two pairs of dancers, whose frenzied footwork and numerous costume changes sated the audience’s appetite for Strictly-style glitz. But this wasn’t enough for one disgruntled member of the crowd who in the interval asked for her money back, citing a lack of sets and dancers.

If what I saw and heard onstage was lacklustre, I’d have been inclined to agree with her. But it wasn’t, leading me to conclude that she missed the point entirely; Tangomotion is a music concert with dance, not, as she expected, a dance show with live music a la Strictly.

Regardless of her views, the talent of musicians and dancers were undeniable.

The violinist only saw her sheet music the day before and both dance couples improvised one of their routines.

And the only reason we knew is because the pianist told us during one of his asides to the crowd, where he explained the history of tango.

The irony of the whole scenario is that Tango Siempre wrote the score for Strictly Come Dancing ex-professionals Vincent Simone and Flavia Cacace’s tour Midnight Tango.

So while it wasn’t Strictly Argentine Tango Live!, it was a night of great dancing and interesting history, led by music that’d get a 10 from Len.