International boatbuilding training college at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard to close

AN INTERNATIONALLY recognised boatbuilding college in Portsmouth is set to close.

Wednesday, 25th May 2022, 2:02 pm

Consultations regarding changes to the International Boatbuilding Training College, based at Boathouse 4 in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, ended on May 17.

Hannah Prowse, chief executive of Portsmouth Naval Base Property Trust, said: ‘The college itself will be closing, but Boathouse 4 will not be.

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Hannah Prowse, chief executive of Portsmouth Naval Base Property Trust, has confirmed the college will be closing. Pictured in 2020 is: Jared Carter, Olly Harvey, Head of College Abi Isherwood, Matt Ralph, Sophie Dykes, James Roser and Fran Wright at IBTC Portsmouth.

Exact dates for the closure are due to be released in a statement on Thursday morning.

Information regarding potential redundancies are yet to be given.

Speaking to The News earlier this month, Ms Prowse said current students will complete their courses, discussions with students and staff were underway, and the college is looking at ‘a huge variety of options’.

She added: ‘We are going to refocus our effort on our historic boat collection, and our volunteer workforce who are utterly invaluable to us.

Boathouse 4, at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. Picture: Malcolm Wells (190815-6386).

‘We are also looking to use this facility to offer greater opportunities for getting young people into career routes and employment.

‘For the students who are currently with us, there will be no change.

‘We will no longer be continuing to offer the courses we once were.

‘We are in discussions with multiple bodies to look at how we can best deliver charitable purposes for the building.’

‘The demand for people who want to do a year long course in traditional wooden boat building just isn’t there at the moment.’

In 2020, the college received funding from the £1.57bn Culture Recovery Fund.

It was one of 445 heritage organisations to receive the financial windfall in the UK.