New shopfront and spa to be built in landmark Southsea hotel

CGI picture of how the Queens Hotel in Southsea could look after a restaurant is opened. From PWP Architects
CGI picture of how the Queens Hotel in Southsea could look after a restaurant is opened. From PWP Architects
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FURTHER regeneration works to a landmark Southsea hotel, including creating a shopfront and spa, will ensure 'every space' of it is used.

Plans to transform the disused Osborne Road side of the Queen's Hotel have been approved.

CGI picture of how the former main entrance of the Queens Hotel in Southsea could look after it is restored. From PWP Architects

CGI picture of how the former main entrance of the Queens Hotel in Southsea could look after it is restored. From PWP Architects

As a result part of the northern side of the Victorian building will be remodelled into a shopfront, with potential for a restaurant. And the venue's former main entrance on the same side will be restored.

Work on other areas of the hotel has already been completed, and plans to build a spa in its basement and regenerate its second floor are still in place.

Speaking on behalf of the hotel, Nick Courtney said: 'Once this refurbishment is complete every space in the hotel will be utilised - there will not be any empty space left.

'Already the ballroom and the restaurant have been refurbished. It's looking like a really nice hotel now.

The Queen's Hotel in Southsea. Picture : Habibur Rahman

The Queen's Hotel in Southsea. Picture : Habibur Rahman

'Work on the second floor will start next year. And work on a spa in the basement will start very soon.

'Any opening of shops along Osborne Road is a good thing because it's using empty space.'

The 68-bed hotel, which was built in 1861, was taken over in March 2017 by private investors. Since then millions of pounds have been spent on restoring the building.

Currently the hotel's second entrance is rarely used, but restorative works will open it up again and include a new canopy over its door.

Mr Courtney added: 'It was the original entrance to the hotel. Behind the facade there was an alcove for horse and cart to drive round to drop off guests.

'I think that's quite special and it's good that it will be restored.'

Plans were approved by Portsmouth City Council's assistant director of city development.

In a report to the council, developers said: 'In short, the intention of the new owners is to rejuvenate the hotel back to its original grandeur and beyond. 

'This proposal only forms part of the ambitious plan towards the new Queen's Hotel vision, and such proposal should be supportive as it will improve the site quality on Osborne Road with new job opportunities and enhance the appearance of the dated Queen’s Hotel.'