Radio man gets a glowing reception after 39 years

John Gordon, 76, right, is retiring this week and leaves Nevada Radio at Fitzherbert Spur, Farlington after 39 year sand is pictured with Nevada MD Mike Devereux. Picture: Malcolm Wells (171219-1292)
John Gordon, 76, right, is retiring this week and leaves Nevada Radio at Fitzherbert Spur, Farlington after 39 year sand is pictured with Nevada MD Mike Devereux. Picture: Malcolm Wells (171219-1292)
Picture: Shaun Roster

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AFTER 39 years in the industry, John Gordon is saying ‘Over and out!’ to his long career in radio.

His career began with a meeting under the cover of darkness in a Portsmouth car park.

In 1978, CB radio was illegal, but Britain was gripped by the craze. People used the frequencies as a space to talk about and share music.

Users adopted a secret slang, leaving police to decipher what it all meant. For example, broadcasters referred to London as Noddy Town and Cardiff as Smokey Dragon.

As one of the few users in the region, it became a community John was very much a part of.

He said: ‘I enjoyed tuning in in secret and talking to people on the road.’

Little did John know he had a fan in Mike Devereux.

Mike overheard John on the airwaves and suggested that the two meet to discuss a ‘big business idea.’

John, 76, said: ‘I was shocked. What we were doing was illegal so for all I knew I could’ve been talking to the police.’

A curious John decided to go to the meeting.

Once there, Mike explained his plans to launch a specialist radio shop, and he wanted John to join him.

‘That’s how it all started.’ said John ‘He owned a music business and I was a electrician. I remember being in The News in 1981 when CB radio was finally legalised. That was a great day! I’ve even written a book on CB radio. ’

John has worked for Nevada Radio for almost four decades, giving specialist radio advice to clients and enthusiasts.

He has seen the shop grow from a small unit in North End to a large shop in Farlington, all the while working alongside Mike.

John said: ‘It sounds odd to call him my boss because he’s a dear friend.

‘All of the members of The Horndean Radio Amateur Club signed a card for me. I’ve made lots of friends over the years and want to thank all of the crew at Nevada.’

To celebrate his retirement, John joined 16 of his colleagues for dinner in Port Solent.

He added: ‘It’s a strange feeling...My wife is excited that she doesn’t have to make the sandwiches any more!

‘I will miss the job at first but I’m really excited for what we have planned. We’ve purchased a motor home and we’re planning to tour Scotland. Once we get it, we’re just going to drive.’