Tenner turned into thousands to help charities

'Thank you' ! - said the staff at The Beneficial Foundation in Fratton Portsmouth as they were handed a cheque for over �2000.00 by Senior staff members of the  NatWest Bank  ''(left to right) Rachel Parker Brown, Jennie Brent, Chris Fenn, Director of Business Banking for NatWest Simon Williams, Peter Williams, Nicky Bleach, Relationship Manager for NatWest Ian Tudor, Kieran Daryanani and Eleanor Hardy with (front) Leon Powell ''Picture: Malcolm Wells (143588-7264)
'Thank you' ! - said the staff at The Beneficial Foundation in Fratton Portsmouth as they were handed a cheque for over �2000.00 by Senior staff members of the NatWest Bank ''(left to right) Rachel Parker Brown, Jennie Brent, Chris Fenn, Director of Business Banking for NatWest Simon Williams, Peter Williams, Nicky Bleach, Relationship Manager for NatWest Ian Tudor, Kieran Daryanani and Eleanor Hardy with (front) Leon Powell ''Picture: Malcolm Wells (143588-7264)

International hotelier is appointed at Marriott

0
Have your say

BANKERS from NatWest in Portsmouth have given something back to a city charity after turning a tenner into thousands using entrepreneurial skills.

In March, the team of 14 from NatWest’s business banking division was set a challenge to take £10 and make as much money from it as they could in six months.

They have now given more than £2,000 to the Beneficial Foundation in Fratton.

Fundraising transactions had to be legal and ethical and activities had to be connected back to the initial £10. The Portsmouth team made the most profit of any team, bringing in £4,245.84.

Their entrepreneurial efforts started with a cake sale and ended with a silent auction, with events in between ranging from buying binoculars to sell at an auction to organising a live music night showcasing local bands.

The profits will be divided between Young Enterprise and the Beneficial Foundation, a Portsmouth charity which provides education, training and rehabilitation to adults in need.

NatWest relationship manager Ian Tudor came up with many of the money-making schemes.

He said: ‘We started off with cake sales, car washing and so on, but I thought that if we wanted to make some real money we would have to buy something and sell it on. One of my customers, Paul Anderson, runs Andy’s Surplus Supplies, selling army and navy equipment and so on.

‘I told him what we were doing and asked if I could buy something at the price he would pay for it and he was more than happy to help.

‘I bought two sets of binoculars and took them to auctions. Paul came with me to an auction in London. We made £163 on the first pair of binoculars and £85 on the second.’

Jennie Brent, chief executive of the Beneficial Foundation, added: ‘We give people choices and empower them to enhance their lifestyles, giving them opportunities to develop skills they need, which will help them to be more independent.

‘Large corporate companies such as NatWest supporting its local community is amazing.’