THE PEOPLE’S CHAMPION

Goodwood Festival of Speed has kick off. Picture: Derek Martin

Best pictures from first day of Goodwood Festival of Speed 2018

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QMy 18 year-old daughter completed a credit card application with a bank. We’ve just discovered she’s run up £1,500 in debt and the card company has contacted us to pay it off. Where do we stand with this worrying situation please?

CC. (email)

AIt’ll all depend on whether you agreed with the bank to act as guarantor of her debts which would be highly unusual in the case of a credit card.

The general rule is that once children legally become adults at the age of 18 they’re responsible for their own debts.

Banks must accept the risk that if a young adult runs into problems handling credit, they cannot simply look to their parents to cough up if they default on the debt.

QI’m the executor of my late father’s estate, and have just recently distributed his all bequests, leaving no money in the estate.

Now out of the blue the garage that serviced his car has sent me a £350 bill for MOT work they claim he had done some six months ago.

In the circumstances I’ve refused to pay up and they’re threatening to take me to court.

Can they do that?

G.A. (email)

AProbably yes. As the executor you were responsible for ensuring that all your father’s debts were paid in full before distributing what was left of his estate to the beneficiaries.

The normal drill is to advertise in the local press for creditors to put in any claims by a specified date.

I understand you didn’t use the services of a solicitor or seek advice before you made the final distribution, so I have to tell you it looks very likely you’ll have to pay up.

QI’ve been offered and accepted a new job but my former employer is refusing to give me a reference. I’ve phoned their HR department and written but they just say they don’t give references as a matter of policy.

Surely that can’t be right?

E.H. (email)

AEmployers have wound up in court about information they’ve supplied in references, so their reluctance is understandable.

Former employers don’t have to give you a reference unless your contract of employment with them gave you a right to one before you left.