Victorious Festival ‘has helped rebuild Portsmouth as up and coming UK destination’

Portsmouth City Council leader Donna Jones
Portsmouth City Council leader Donna Jones
James Crook

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VICTORIOUS Festival has been key to the transformation of Portsmouth.

That’s the view of council leader Donna Jones as she welcomed a report revealing the huge economic boom the music spectacle has had.

It’s well organised, and just the sort of thing that the town needs. The retailers and convenience stores were packed.

Tony Brown, chairman of The Southsea Association

Cllr Jones said: ‘A number of things have happened in Portsmouth over the past two years to aid regeneration, increase employment and rebuild Portsmouth as an up-and-coming city in the UK.

One of the main contributors of that is Victorious Festival.

‘The economic impact of Victorious on the city is fantastic.’

Thirty-six per cent of visitors visited a pub, bar or restaurant and 31 per cent visited cafes.

Overall, non-residents liked the city as a place to visit – 80 per cent rated it positively – with a quarter rating it as excellent.

Tony Brown, chairman of The Southsea Association, said: ‘It’s well organised, and just the sort of thing that the town needs.

‘The retailers and convenience stores were packed. I am sure the pubs and restaurants benefited as well.

‘On the Sunday night down Palmerston Road, there were people having an excellent time.’ While 45 per cent of visitors now have a better perception of the city, this is a drop of 10 per cent from 2014, and the report says more must be done to encourage reasons to return.

It says: ‘...although these are very positive findings, they do represent a slight drop in positivity from 2014, so ongoing efforts are needed to ensure the festival encourages and promotes reasons to return to Portsmouth.’

Almost half – 46 per cent – came to the festival by car, a four per cent increase from 2014. About a third walked part of the journey, while 19 per cent used public transport; and 10 per cent used the train, a decrease of 6 per cent from 2014.

Visitors aged 24 and under were the most likely to travel by train – 20 per cent – and the least likely to be driving – 35 per cent.