Fundraisers do their bit to keep Erin's memory alive

A COMMUNITY have rallied together to support a grieving mother's efforts to keep her daughter's memory alive.

Monday, 15th August 2016, 5:00 am
Updated Thursday, 25th August 2016, 4:20 pm
Edith Horn, two,, Casey Smith, 12 and Jake Barker, 12 meet a chameleon Pictures: Mick Young (161075-03)

Helen Dunn’s two-year-old daughter Erin died earlier this year from Global Development Delay (GDD), a condition which affects a young child’s motor speech, cognitive and social skills.

Helen has since launched a campaign to raise £5,000 to set up an Erin’s Wish charity that supports families who are and have gone through the same ordeal.

And yesterday she held a community fundraising day so money could be raised towards the project.

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Fun Day co-organiser Helen Dunn poses with members of the Saltire Twirlers who performed on the day Picture: Mick Young (161075-05)

A football tournament for the ‘Erin’s Wish Cup’, children’s rides and other entertainment was laid on at Portsmouth’s Admiral Lord Nelson School.

Helen, who lives in Purbrook, said: ‘I am immensely grateful for the community’s support.

‘I’ve been overwhelmed.

‘Local businesses have supported me and people have made up T-shirts.

Fun Day co-organiser Helen Dunn poses with members of the Saltire Twirlers who performed on the day Picture: Mick Young (161075-05)

‘I have cried a lot because it means so much to me, to keep the memory of my daughter alive.’

Helen has already raised £3,000 so she can set up a memorial bench for Erin at Morelands Primary School, in Waterlooville, where Helen’s son Alex, six, is a pupil. The family’s long-term aspiration is to raise enough cash to set up a support centre specifically for families who have children with GDD.

Helen’s twin sister, Evelyn Steel, says her son William, seven, shows signs of autism.

Evelyn said: ‘After Erin’s passing, as a family we made changes.

‘I reduced my hours at work so I could be with my children, and I have chosen a different career, partly because the NHS didn’t get Erin through the system quickly enough because of its processes.’

As reported, Norse South East honoured Erin’s memory by putting her name on the back of a waste truck.