NOSTALGIA: Can you ID Portsmouth brickfields workers?

Here we see more of the men who made the bricks that formed our city. (Jim Randall.)
Here we see more of the men who made the bricks that formed our city. (Jim Randall.)
Liliana Albulescu from Romania, takes a look at a Romania newspaper with Dr Alan Burnett from Portsmouth Polytechnic

THIS WEEK IN 1990: Portsmouth businesses urged to forge trade links in Romania

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Further to my recent article on the brickfields of Portsmouth, Jim Randall sent me this family photographs from about 1920.

He tells me his family were involved in the trade for many years.

A Southdown bus ploughs through floodwater at Gable Head, Hayling Island. 'Picture: Roger Allen Collection

A Southdown bus ploughs through floodwater at Gable Head, Hayling Island. 'Picture: Roger Allen Collection

Jim’s mother’s aunt Georgina had a large family in Copnor and her husband William Welch worked at Burrfields as well as at least two sons.

In this photograph we see two sons Fred Welch (with dog) and George (Harry) Welch seated to the right of him.

The handsome looking man in the middle is James Wallis who married Georgina’s daughter Lucy.

The two men on the outside men are unknown but perhaps someone recognises them.

In days gone by every lad wanted to be a train driver or perhaps travel on the Portsmouth City Fire Brigade multi-laddered fire engine.  'Picture: Barry Cox Collection

In days gone by every lad wanted to be a train driver or perhaps travel on the Portsmouth City Fire Brigade multi-laddered fire engine. 'Picture: Barry Cox Collection

• The picture of the Southdown single decker in deep floodwater was taken at Hayling Island.

My colleague Barry Cox tells me it is probably an early post-war scene at Gable Head which was prone to flooding at the time.

The bus appears well-loaded and I wonder if this was taken on market day in Havant where the bus will terminate?

• In days past, a young boy’s dream was to be a steam engine driver, or perhaps, join the fire brigade and work with one of the magnificent fire engines seen on the facing page.

Standing in Highbury Street, Old Portsmouth here we see the home of Admiral Lord Howe with a relief built into the wall.

Standing in Highbury Street, Old Portsmouth here we see the home of Admiral Lord Howe with a relief built into the wall.

It belonged to the City of Portsmouth Fire Brigade.

What could be more thrilling than driving around the city ringing the large brass bell perhaps shouting ‘Get out of the way’ to some unfortunate motorist blocking the road.

To be at the top of the ladder must have taken nerves of steel the first time a firemen went up it and what a marvellous sight it must have made.

I think the location is the original Somers Road fire station.

• If I had more space I could tell you much more about Admiral Lord Richard Howe.

If he had been a few years younger, I believe he could have been the man who would have routed the combined French and Spanish fleets at Trafalgar instead of Nelson.

He was born in 1726 and by the time he was 29 he was a commander. He became an admiral aged 54 and First Lord of the Admiralty at 57.

Although this is a view, below, of his house in Old Portsmouth, he died at 11, Grafton Street, London, on August 5, 1799, aged 73.