NOSTALGIA: HMS Victory looking sparse in dry dock almost 100 years ago

HMS Victory shortly after going into dry dock in 1922. Picture: Robert James Collection
HMS Victory shortly after going into dry dock in 1922. Picture: Robert James Collection
Liliana Albulescu from Romania, takes a look at a Romania newspaper with Dr Alan Burnett from Portsmouth Polytechnic

THIS WEEK IN 1990: Portsmouth businesses urged to forge trade links in Romania

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Here we see HMS Victory some years after being dry-docked on January 12, 1922.

On the upper deck a shed can be seen and she is quite sparse in the rigging department.

Long-gone and built over, here we see the Sailors Return, Mile End, Portsmouth.

Long-gone and built over, here we see the Sailors Return, Mile End, Portsmouth.

Her shrouds – which are the rope ladders used to climb the mast – are nowhere near quite what they would have been if she had still been in service.

The yardarms do not have the studding sail (stun’sail) booms fixed to them either.

The prow behind the figurehead seems to be covered with a tarpaulin.

Today, because of the poor state of the ship, all the upper masts (topmasts, topgallants and royals) have been removed to reduce the weight bearing down on the hull.

At one time the building on the corner of Penny Street and Grand Parade, Old Portsmouth, was a Princess Christian Home.

At one time the building on the corner of Penny Street and Grand Parade, Old Portsmouth, was a Princess Christian Home.

Since 2012 she has been the flagship of the First Sea Lord.

Previously, she was flagship to the Second Sea Lord.

•Here’s a long-gone and forgotten public house, the Sailors Return.

It was one of many that once stood along the Mile End part of Commercial Road.

At first glance you may not recognise the location but it shows soldiers marching through Grand Parade, Old Portsmouth.

At first glance you may not recognise the location but it shows soldiers marching through Grand Parade, Old Portsmouth.

As can be seen, it was on the corner of Prospect Road and Commercial Road, Mile End.

Prospect Road still exists, although it is now shortened and this junction is now under the M275 motorway.

•I am glad to say that amid all the carnage during the Blitz the buildings seen in the Old Portsmouth photograph all survived.

To the right, out of shot, is the Garrison Church which lost its roof on the night of January 10, 1941.

The building on the corner of Penny Street and Grand Parade, now living accommodation, was once a nursing home of Princess Christian.

The princess was a daughter of Queen Victoria, christened Princess Helena.

She married German Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein.

She was a founding member of the Red Cross and president of the Royal British Nursing Association.

The homes named after her are still in existence some 94 years after her death.

•At first glance the location of the last image might leave you guessing.

But it is Grand Parade to the left and the soldiers are turning right from Penny Street, Old Portsmouth. They have just attended a church service at the Garrison Church, part of which can be seen between the branches of the tree left of centre.

The building to the left, The Soldiers and Sailors Help Society, is the building in the previous photograph showing Princess Christian Home.

I cannot make out what the structure is on the right behind the banking. Any guesses?