NOSTALGIA: Pigs to the slaughter in Old Portsmouth

No saving their bacon  Pigs arriving at Point from the Isle of Wight for slaughter.
No saving their bacon Pigs arriving at Point from the Isle of Wight for slaughter.

THIS WEEK IN 1991: Controls scare as carrier puts to sea

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Three of the photographs here come from the collection of Mike Nolan who was born and grew up at Point, Old Portsmouth, and has an encyclopedic knowledge of the area.

He tells me there were three landing stages at Point at one time and in this photograph we can see all three.

The Isle of Wight car ferry arrivng at Point, Old Portsmouth. Imagine such a small vessel today.

The Isle of Wight car ferry arrivng at Point, Old Portsmouth. Imagine such a small vessel today.

On the far left is where the car ferry arrived from Fishbourne, Isle of Wight.

Part of this remains today although there are flood gates now protecting Broad Street from the high tides that once regularly flooded it – and not too long ago either.

In the centre is where the Gosport ferry called to pick up passengers in the days when it made a three-point call – Portsmouth Harbour, Point and Gosport, and in reverse of course.

On the right is where the floating bridge between Portsmouth and Gosport landed its cargo of cars and other goods.

It seems impossible today but at one time there were three landing stages at Point, Old Portsmouth.

It seems impossible today but at one time there were three landing stages at Point, Old Portsmouth.

What a shame there is nothing like it today which would save so many people that long, long trek around to Gosport.

•With saloon cars of all types here we see the car ferry after its arrival from Fishbourne, Isle of Wight, in the early 1950s.

It always makes me wonder what happened to the lifeboats when the ships where taken out of service. Does anyone know?

In the background can be seen part of HMS Vernon, now, of course, Gunwharf Quays.

Portsmouth Harbour is noted for its busy-ness and that there is always something going on. Just one small motor boat proves the point in this picture. It must have been early in the morning when the Evening News photographer took this photograph. In the foreground are the foundations of the tower blocks at Gosport.

Portsmouth Harbour is noted for its busy-ness and that there is always something going on. Just one small motor boat proves the point in this picture. It must have been early in the morning when the Evening News photographer took this photograph. In the foreground are the foundations of the tower blocks at Gosport.

Seeing the giant vessels that carry traffic across the Solent today one can only wonder what the situation would be if modern ferries did not exist to carry modern traffic.

This is the first of three locations where traffic could board for Fishbourne.

After finishing at the end of Broad Street loading moved around the corner to East Street and when that became redundant it moved to where it is today in Gunwharf Road.

Many people think say it is a pity room could not be made for the ferry terminal further up the harbour at a point where traffic could come off the M275 and straight on to the ships instead of having to drive all through the city causing chaos in the summer along Museum Road and in St George’s Road.

•Another arrival from the Isle of Wight but this time it is pigs to the slaughter.

They would be herded into East Street where there were pens for the pigs to be held until taken on to the slaughterhouse.

Mike tells me of one that got away and ran into his grandmother’s house.

It careered along the hall and then up the stairs to the bedrooms. Chaos reigned until the porker was recaptured.