NOSTALGIA: Portsmouth church was converted into British Restaurant during war

THEN: Highland Road Methodist church, Eastney, Portsmouth.
THEN: Highland Road Methodist church, Eastney, Portsmouth.
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I recently published the photograph above not having the faintest idea where it was.

So I was somewhat astounded to find it was just up the road from where I once lived in Highland Road, Eastney, although it had been demolished at the time I was in residence.

NOW: The site of the church today complete with modern building.

NOW: The site of the church today complete with modern building.

It is in fact the Methodist church on the corner of Adair Road and right opposite the junction with Prince Albert Road.

Mike Murphy tells me his grandmother worked there during the war when it was used as a British Restaurant.

Below is the modern building with much improved facilities.

•Glance at the third picture here and judging by the figurehead below the bowsprit you might think it’s the tea clipper Cutty Sark.

The starboard bow of the ship-rigged corvette HMS Boadicea fitting out in Portsmouth dockyard in 1877. 'Picture: Robert James Collection

The starboard bow of the ship-rigged corvette HMS Boadicea fitting out in Portsmouth dockyard in 1877. 'Picture: Robert James Collection

However, it is not a merchantman but a warship of the Victorian Royal Navy.

It is the Bacchante class HMS Boadicea seen fitting out in Portsmouth dockyard in 1877.

She had been launched the previous year after construction in the dockyard.

Although classed as a corvette she was ship-rigged and carried 16 guns of screw design.

When she was dismasted in 1900 she was the last square-rigged steam vessel preceding sail-less ships.

She was broken up about 1905.

The name Boadicea seems to have been a popular name in the navy with four ships and a naval establishment bearing the name.