NOSTALGIA: Queues as far as the eye could see as drivers waited at Bedhampton gates

The boys seem delighted to be in the photograph taken from the footbridge at Bedhampton crossing looking along New Road in the 1930s. 'Picture: Ralph Cousins Collection
The boys seem delighted to be in the photograph taken from the footbridge at Bedhampton crossing looking along New Road in the 1930s. 'Picture: Ralph Cousins Collection
Firemen battle with the blaze at Havant Thicket

THIS WEEK IN 1984: Forest blaze ruins 10 acres of Havant trees

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Here we have a view along New Road, Bedhampton in the days before the railway was electrified.

The semi-detatched houses on the left were railwaymen’s houses. I believe the signalmen who worked in the Bedhampton box, (out of shot to the right) lived in them, but stand to be corrected.

A look along widened New Road today. You can still see the railings under the tree.

A look along widened New Road today. You can still see the railings under the tree.

During the 1960s, with the increase in traffic, there were queues as far as the eye could see waiting to join the A27 which crossed the railway here. It was not until the gates were closed for a train that the traffic could get across the oncoming traffic.

Iron railings keep pedestrians away from the tracks.

Then we see the same view today. As mentioned earlier, the traffic queued here forever, but in the 1960s New Road was widened and traffic given the right of way as can be seen. The houses in the distant left lost half their gardens in the widening process.

The junction can cause problems with traffic heading west as drivers drive on to the crossing instead of waiting for a clear road on the other side. I have seen several nasty incidents when the barriers need to be lowered but a car is stuck in the middle of the crossing.

The Gut, Strait Street, Malta.

The Gut, Strait Street, Malta.

The final picture shows a cartoon of drunken sailors on a night out in The Gut, Malta.

Any former sailor seeing this cartoon will remember bawdy nights out in Malta.

This street of bars was thronged by men of all ranks and The Cairo was a popular haunt.

It was said that young sailors spent all their money on wine, women and song, the rest was wasted.

At the end of an evening the whole street would be full of laid-out drunken sailors. The local military police were somewhat evil and would use sailors as punch bags. The Naval Provost spent much of their time getting sailors, who wore full uniform in those pre-terrorist days, back to their ships.

I am sure many of you will have memories of this awesome street and I’d love to hear some of your tales.