NOSTALGIA: Who remembers Radio Victory?

Faces, or voices, from the past, the popular Radio Victory presenters in 1977.
Faces, or voices, from the past, the popular Radio Victory presenters in 1977.
LBK6 leaves Portsmouth  on May 10, 2007.  Picture: Mike Nolan.

NOSTALGIA: D-Day floating kitchen leaves Portsmouth

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I am sure many of you remember Portsmouth’s own radio station, Radio Victory, even though it closed 32 years ago.

Launched on October 14, 1975, it was an immediate success, especially during the Falklands war.

A look over the dockyard wall when the road was a right of way from Portsea to Landport along Flathouse Road.

A look over the dockyard wall when the road was a right of way from Portsea to Landport along Flathouse Road.

The news of the sinking of HMS Sheffield was broadcast by newsreader Penny Guy. She must have been distraught as her fiancé was on board. He survived and they later married.

The station was based in Fratton Road in St Mary’s Institute and perhaps the best-known presenter was Chrissie Pollard who joined TVS when it began broadcasting.

Victory survived until 1985 when the Independent Broadcasting Authority closed the station. It ceased to operate on June 28, 1986 when Fratton Road was blocked by traffic with drivers sounding their horns in protest.

• At one time there was a right of way alongside the dockyard wall from Portsea to Landport along Flathouse Road, passing in front of the Unicorn Gate entrance to the ’yard.

A once-thriving industry in the city was brick-making and here we see brickfields at Copnor in a picture taken about a century ago. Does anyone know the exact location? There appear to be dozens of men making thousands of bricks, no doubt used  for the city's houses.

A once-thriving industry in the city was brick-making and here we see brickfields at Copnor in a picture taken about a century ago. Does anyone know the exact location? There appear to be dozens of men making thousands of bricks, no doubt used for the city's houses.

I believe when Unicorn Gate was extended along Unicorn Road leaving the original gate standing alone, Flathouse Road was blocked off for security reasons.

Here we are looking over the dockyard wall from flats in King William Street or Cumberland Street.

• A once thriving industry in the city was brick making and here we see brick fields at Copnor. can anyone locate the exact location today I wonder?

There appears to be dozens of men making thousands of bricks no doubt use for the city’s housing.

Paint some yellow lines and add modern street lighting and this scene at Midhurst would be the same today.

Paint some yellow lines and add modern street lighting and this scene at Midhurst would be the same today.

• The final picture is of Midhurst, a popular place to visit for Sunday lunch. The town is unchanging and in this view from the 1930s all that needs to be added are yellow lines and modern lighting and it would be the same.