When horses ruled the streets of Portsmouth

George Good with one of his ponies dressed overall on Southsea Common and, inset, two of his men with a horse and cart.
George Good with one of his ponies dressed overall on Southsea Common and, inset, two of his men with a horse and cart.
Phil Spaven, Paul Morgan. Ian Whitewood and Roger Glancefield with Paul Morgan's 1940s Willys JEEP    (180082_01)

History re-enactors herald the opening of Second World War film

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My article last week on the horses that might have had to be put down because stables in Sussex Road were being demolished, brought a letter from Jackie Baynes.

She is the author of An Earthly Fairyland – The Story of Southsea Rock Gardens and Pavilion.

Jackie says she was contacted by Eunice, a 99-year-old local woman who was keen to tell her about her father George Good.

George had been in the Veterinary Corps in the First World War. After he was demobbed his skill with and love of horses led him to set up a haulage business using horses and carts. Eunice says the stables were in Aylward Street, Portsea.

Two of Eunice’s photographs were used in the book.

George Good’s company was contracted to Portsmouth Corporation to remove the spoil dug out with pick and shovel to form the concave shape of the Rock Gardens.

The men doing the digging were employed on a government sponsored ‘back to work’ scheme following the depression in the mid-1920s. The Rock Gardens opened in 1928.

The photograph shows George Good with his pony at a show on Southsea Common and two of his employees with a horse and cart, possibly in Aylward Street. Does anyone recognise the men?