When your old kettle was converted into a Spitfire

EDUCATE Womens Voluntary Service members on a street fuel drive somewhere in Portsmouth, November 1942
EDUCATE Womens Voluntary Service members on a street fuel drive somewhere in Portsmouth, November 1942
David Janess May 1964 picture of the tiny post office  opposite Tracys in Commercial Road, Portsmouth.

NOSTALGIA: Tiny Portsmouth post office carried on trading

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Today we pay tribute to the sometimes unsung work carried out by women during the Second World War.

By 1941 one million women belonged to the Women’s Voluntary Service. They had proved their worth during the blitz but then came the Battle of the Atlantic and the devastating toll of merchant ships sunk by U-boats which led to dire shortages in Britain.

KETTLE John Cass posted this picture and the one above on the Do You Remember... in Portsmouth Facebook page. He says: How times have changed. What was once a valuable commodity, you now have to pay to get rid of at the tip

KETTLE John Cass posted this picture and the one above on the Do You Remember... in Portsmouth Facebook page. He says: How times have changed. What was once a valuable commodity, you now have to pay to get rid of at the tip

The WVS did all it could to help collect material for the war effort such as aluminium pots and pans which could be melted down and used to build ships or planes. They also taught people not to waste what they had.

Each WVS centre had its own Salvage Officer and Food Leader. The latter did whatever was required to help the authorities in the complicated task of food rationing. Educational pamphlets were produced and lectures held.

The WVS organised campaigns such as Salute the Soldier, Wings for Victory, Spitfire Funds and Warship Week.

ALUMINIUM Pots and pans collected by the WVS to be melted down to help the war effort

ALUMINIUM Pots and pans collected by the WVS to be melted down to help the war effort